Waders
Footwear
Outerwear
Layering
Sportswear
Women's
Bag & Packs
Accessories
Rods & Reels
Fly Accessories
Wading
Jackets
Vests
Clothing
Baselayer
Accessories
Pack & Travel
Rods & Reels
Fly Accessories
Rod
Switch
Spey
Reels
Outfits
Lines
Luggage
Apparel
Accessories
Cross S1 Solutions
Reels
Single-Hand Rods
Double-Hand Rods
Kits
Lines
Apparel
Accessories
All
About Loop
Trout
Steelhead
Saltwater
Specialty
Apparel
All
Test Drive a Red Truck
Red Truck Resources
Pinot Noir
Syrah
Grenache
Summer White
Accessories
Fly Rod Outfits
Fly Accessories
All
Patagonia
Leland Gift Guide
Fly Rods
Reels
Lines
Wading
Clothing
Women's
Pack & Travel
Leland Fly Boxes
Accessories
Flies
Fly Tying
Media
Gift Card
About Leland
Learn to Fly Fish
Fly Fishing Gear
Places to Fly Fish
Sonoma
Sierra Nevada
New Zealand
British Columbia
Florida Keys
Artist Paul Waters
All
50% Off Redington
Rod Sale
Reel Sale
Line Sale
Wading Sale
Clothing Sale
Accessories Sale
Flies Sale
Tying Sale
Deal of the Day
Book Sale
DVD Sale
Leader - Tippet Sale
Leland Upgrade
Upgrade your Rods
Upgrade your Reels
Gear to Upgrade Too

Videos

Search Results
DVD: Rise: The Movie - A Confluence Film
Individual stories shot around the world; stories that together reflect the attraction that fly fishing has for all of us.
959
id::959
thumbnail::DVD-DES-RISE-THE-0000-0000.jpg
desc::Individual stories shot around the world; stories that together reflect the attraction that fly fishing has for all of us.
itemprice::$20.97
Price::$20.97
pricelevel::$29.95
baseprice::$29.95
Name::DVD: Rise: The Movie - A Confluence Film
Rod Weight::
Rod Length::
Reel Line Weight::
Rod Action::
Series::
Featured::On sale
Category::Media
Fishing::
Brand::Anglers Book
Rod Type::
Primary Color::
Size::
Line Weight::
type::item
mediaimg::http://www.lelandfly.com/DVD-Rise-The-Movie-A-Confluence-Film-image.jpg
url::http://www.lelandfly.com/On-Sale/DVD-Sale/DVD-Rise-The-Movie-A-Confluence-Film.html
thumb::http://www.lelandfly.com/DVD-Rise-The-Movie-A-Confluence-Film-image.jpg
detdesc::In 2008, Confluence Films debuted
DRIFT, a highly acclaimed documentary that captivated the fly fishing
community. In 2009, riding on the success of DRIFT,
director/cinematographer Chris Patterson of Warren Miller Entertainment
and executive producer Jim Klug once again set out in search of new
locations and the totally unique stories, characters and species that
epitomize the spirit and soul of flyfishing.




This new film is RISE - a collection of individual stories shot
around the world; stories that together truly reflect the attraction
that flyfishing has for all of us. Shot on location in the Florida Keys,
Argentina, Idaho, New Orleans, Venezuela, and Alaska. RISE is a
stunning feature-length film, photographed entirely on 16mm film and
mastered in HD.
featdesc::
video::
sku::10487
rating::0
Fly Category::
Fly Stage::
Fly Tying::
quantity::1
dealdaycont::
addtocart::
{{thumbnail}}
{{itemlink}}
{{desc}}
Regular Price: {{itemprice}}
Special Price: {{itemprice}}
{{addtocart}}
Log In to add this item to your Wish List.
What is a Peacock Bass
282
id::282
thumbnail::Peacock-Bass.jpg
desc::
itemprice::N/A
Price::
pricelevel::
baseprice::
Name::What is a Peacock Bass
Rod Weight::
Rod Length::
Reel Line Weight::
Rod Action::
Series::
Featured::
Category::
Fishing::
Brand::
Rod Type::
Primary Color::
Size::
Line Weight::
type::infoitem
mediaimg::
url::http://www.lelandfly.com/In-Stock/Fly-Fishes/What-is-a-Peacock-Bass.html
thumb::http://www.lelandfly.com/Peacock-Bass.jpg
detdesc::

Peacock Bass

A Guide To Giant Peacock Bass Fly Fishing In The Amazon

By Octavio Campos Salles Araujo (BG)

There is a growing interest among fly fishermen in traveling to the Amazon, but many are discouraged by a series of doubts, like where and when to go, what fish species will be encountered, what tackle to use, what precautions to take, etc. We hope this two-part article will clear up this and other doubts about fly fishing in this fantastic region of the planet.

The Amazon Rainforest:

The Amazon is the biggest portion of Rainforest in the world, with over 6 millon square km, spreading through Brazil, Bolivia, Venezuela, Colombia, Ecuador, Guyana, French Guyana, Suriname and Peru. In this immense jungle you will find the biggest diversity of ethnical groups and Indian languages in the American Continent, the argest rivers in the world, the biggest and most varied biodiversity, etc. Just to give you an idea, in the Amazon Basin alone there are more fish species than in all the Atlantic Ocean, and there are still hundreds, maybe thousands of species yet to be discovered. The same holds true for insects, birds and amphibians.

The potential of both chemical compounds and gene compositions of plant and animal species yet to be discovered or studied can provide precious new sources of food, cures for diseases and many other benefits which are still unforeseen by Man. Many of these benefits are already known by indians. For instance there is an indian tribe who uses a certain species of ant to treat poisonous snake bites. They purposely put the ants over the wound and let them sting it, and that apparently cures the negative effects of the snake poison.

Underneath the Amazon there is also a countless wealth in the form of oil fields that together occupies an area the size of Europe. The oil is just now starting to be explored by the Brazilian Government and everyone hopes that this exploration will be done in an enviromentaly correct way.

The Amazon River is so huge in volume of water that 60 miles offshore from its mouth at the Atlantic Ocean you still navigate over fresh, muddy water. That is how the Amazon River was first identified by the spanish explorer Vicente Yanez Pinzon, who called it Mar Dulce (fresh water sea) in the 15th. century.

Contrary to what was believed back in the 70's, the Amazon Rainforest is not the lung of the world, as it produces as much oxygen by photosynthesis as it absorbs. On the other hand the forest provides an invaluable service to the planet by regulating the amount of carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide in the atmosphere as well as regulating the distribution of rain in half of Latin America. The build-up of carbon dioxide and monoxide on the atmosphere is the main cause of the increase in Earth's temperature, so you can say that the Amazon is the "air conditioner" of the planet.

Traveling to the Amazon:

Traveling to the Brazilian Amazon from North America or Europe is pretty easy as there is a direct flight connection to Manaus from Miami. The Brazilian Government requires a tourist visa from Canadian and US citizens, as well as most European countries. The visa can be personally issued in any Brazilian Embassy, present in most big cities of North America. You may want to choose to fill-out the visa application form available to print from the internet and send it through regular mail. You can also contact your local travel agency and they should take care of the paperwork.

Fishing in the Amazon

Most anglers coming to the Amazon for the first time are usually very worried about the dangers from the jungle. In reality the dark water rivers are a very safe region of the Amazon, tropical diseases are nearly non-existent and there is really no need to take precaution about that. The region is free of biting insects too, making for comfortable living conditions. The only thing you should worry about a little are stingrays, so when wading or taking a dip at the river be sure to shuffle your feet instead of stepping, just like the guys on the saltwater flats do. The sun can also offer some danger for very sun-sensitive persons, so it's important to use strong sun screen and wear good quality tropical clothing.

The language spoken in Brazil is portuguese, but on a good trip option, your english speaking host will meet you at the airport and stay with you throughout the trip. Another good reason to look for trips with hosts that stays with the group during the whole trip, and not just while in the city.

Brazil is a country in relatively good economic and political stability. Its local people are very friendly toward tourists and always willing to share a bit of their rich culture.

Where to go:

The biggest peacock bass are not in every river of the Amazon, instead they can only be found in certain rivers mainly in central Amazon. These rivers are characterized by its dark, acid water and many marginal sloughts and lakes, the ideal habitat of Cichla temensis, the largest peacock bass species.

There are basically two main watersheds within the Amazon Basin where you can find this peacock bass, these are the Rio Negro to the north and the Rio Madeira to the south. The tributaries of these rivers is where the biggest peacock bass in the world comes from, specially from the Rio Negro watershed.

Rio Negro means "Dark River," which is very aptly named. Its water is very dark in color and usually free of biting insects as they can not reproduce in the acid water. Manaus, the biggest city in the Brazilian Amazon and the gateway to peacock bass fishing in Brazil, is situated on its banks. The two main kinds of water from the Amazon can be observed when the Negro and Solimões Rivers meet to form the mighty Amazon River, only a few miles from Manaus. The Negro with its dark water and the Solimões with its muddy water. The two different waters don't mix for 8 miles, running alongside like two different rivers within one huge river.

Unfortunately nearly all easily reached locations have been fished-out by either sport and commercial fishermen and that is why it is today very important to travel to very remote areas in search of unexplored rivers where big peacock bass are abundant and aggressive. These unexplored rivers usually have some kind of natural barrier that prevents easy navigation, like shallow rocky areas or rapids. Some are even too sinuous and this avoids access with float planes as they don't have areas large enough to land.

The headwaters of the tributaries are usually the least known and explored areas, and that is where the most succesfull fishing trips happen today. For the fly fisherman these areas are also much better than the areas downriver because their lakes are shallower and smaller so the fish are more easily attracted to flies. Anglers can also sight-fish a lot of times in these areas.

Look for outfitters who provide trips to these remote locations if you are serious about catching big peacock bass on fly. Facilities may not be top-class but it's perfectly suited for the angler with an exploring mind and spirit of adventure.

When to go:

Choosing the right time to go can mean the difference between success and total failure. Peacock bass fishing depends a lot on low water levels because during the flood season, when waters may rise over 40 feet, the baitfish swims into the flooded forest and the peacock bass follow them. Fishing during this time is completely unproductive.

The best outfitters carefully track and study weather patterns and changes when planning their fishing season in an effort to fish on the right places at the right time. It's not always easy since it may vary significantly and there are many variations according to certain areas of the Amazon. Basically the dry season starts to the south of the Amazon River by June and goes on until October, moving slowly to the north until reaching the rivers north of the Amazon River from late August to March.

This means that the Rio Negro watershed, where the biggest peacocks come from, is generally fishable from September to March according to the specific region within this huge watershed.

Fish Species:

Peacock Bass are the most abundant gamefish in the rivers of central Amazon. Even though there are other gamefish species in these rivers, the peacock bass is the focus of nearly all anglers coming to this area. They are not nearly remotely related to the largemouth bass of North America, instead they are cichlids, a huge family of fish species common in Latin America and Africa.

Speckled Peacock Bass: This is the largest of all peacock bass species, reaching sizes of nearly 30 pounds. Of course a fish of that size is very rare. On good, remote locations they average 10 to 18 pounds, with bigger fish always around. This is still under scientific discussion, but it's generally accepted that females have spots and males have three distinct dark bars and a yellowish coloration, as well as a hump on top of the head during mating season. They are very aggressive and territorial and will strike topwater flies with a vengeance. Most people who have fished for it agrees that they show the most spectacular and ferocious topwater strike of all fish. Everyone who enjoys casting topwater flies among varied structure for big fish must go peacock bass fishing in the Amazon at least once in a lifetime. Their fight is brutal and they always seek structures to cut or wrap the line.

Butterly Peacock Bass

Butterfly Peacock Bass: This is a smaller peacock bass species, but very abundant. There are actually two species of what is wrongly called butterfly peacock bass. One of them is the true butterfly peacock bass, with three big blotches on the side, and another species, which shows dark uneven bars and a more yellowish coloration. Both are quite small on average, but may reach sizes up to 13 pounds.

Traira: A very aggressive fish with sharp teeth and a powerfull jaw. They strike just about anything that moves close enough to it and are very abundant on the shallow areas. They average 2 to 4 pounds and are fun on light rods, as well as an important food source for large peacock bass. These fish are very pre-hystoric looking and it is believed they come from ancient times.

Arawana: The arawana is a famous fish among aquarium hobbyists because of their unusual, snake-like appearance. They are quite aggressive and will strike a variety of patterns. Once hooked they put up a good fight, with jumps and runs. A TV documentary on a British channel became famous by showing the scene of an arawana jumping out of the water to get a bug on an overhanging three in the flooded forest. This shows that they have great eyesight.

Jacundá

Jacundá: This beautifull fish is known in the aquarium hobby as pike cichlid. Despite their small average size they are very strong and aggressive and very fun on light fly rods. They come in many varied colors.

Piranha: There are mainly two species of piranhas in the dark water rivers. The black and the silver. The black piranha is the biggest one, reaching 10 pounds or more. They can be aggressive but nearly never against people. There is a lot of myth around piranha attacks and it's just not true. They can only be dangerous when locked in a small lagoon where no more food is available, otherwise they won't bother with you at all and you can swim at the river without worrying. Catching them on flies is not the easiest thing, which is pretty good because they destroy the fly in a heartbeat with their sharp, scissors-like teeth.

There are many other fish species in the black water rivers, like oscar, apapa, bicuda, pacu, arapaima and giant catfish. ~ Octavio

Next time: Best spots and what equipment to bring.

Octavio Campos Salles Araujo organizes and hosts unique fly fishing trips to remote locations of the Brazilian Amazon, where the rivers are still uncharted and big fish are numerous. Check out his website at www.amazonflyfishing.com for more.

featdesc::
video::[Error processing dynamic tag getCurrentAttribute("item","custitem_product_video") : record infoitem 282 not found]
sku::What is a Peacock Bass
rating::0
Fly Category::
Fly Stage::
Fly Tying::
quantity::0
dealdaycont::
addtocart::
{{thumbnail}}
{{itemlink}}
{{desc}}
Regular Price: {{itemprice}}
Special Price: {{itemprice}}
{{addtocart}}
Log In to add this item to your Wish List.
What is a Marlin
300
id::300
thumbnail::Marlin.jpg
desc::
itemprice::N/A
Price::
pricelevel::
baseprice::
Name::What is a Marlin
Rod Weight::
Rod Length::
Reel Line Weight::
Rod Action::
Series::
Featured::
Category::
Fishing::
Brand::
Rod Type::
Primary Color::
Size::
Line Weight::
type::infoitem
mediaimg::
url::http://www.lelandfly.com/In-Stock/Fly-Fishes/What-is-a-Marlin.html
thumb::http://www.lelandfly.com/Marlin.jpg
detdesc::

Marlin

Billfish: Out of the Blue

by Bob Stearns

A class tippet is important to help prevent losing your entire rig on a big sail. But if you've never caught a sailfish, you should go with a 30-pound-class tippet to first land a fish before dropping to a lighter class.

WHAT OTHER GAME FISH can you catch that is longer than your fly rod? Fisheries scientists tell us that the sailfish is very likely the fastest fish in the ocean, and from personal experience I tend to agree. The entire process of catching a sail on a fly — which starts with the sail attacking the teaser and ends when you finally release the fish — is exciting to the extreme. And for those of you who have yet to try it, this is how it works.


Sailfish

A sailfish spread consists of several hookless teasers trolled behind the boat until a sailfish appears behind one of them. Your companions or a crew member then picks up the rod that has the hot teaser and begins to reel it in slowly, playing a deliberate cat-and-mouse game with the increasingly aggressive billfish. You pick up your fly rod, shake some line out of the tip, and get ready to cast. It may seem like a pulse-pounding eternity until the sail is within casting range, but you must wait for the skipper to take the engines out of gear and the teaser to be yanked out of the water.

All billfish are totally fearless when it comes to boats. If everything goes as planned, the sail has chased the teaser right up to the transom and is now eagerly trying to relocate it. At this moment you make your cast, but not in front of the fish. Instead, you place the fly as far as possible behind it and generate a loud blurp with the 10-inch foam-head popper. You may even have to work the popper once or maybe even twice more to get the sail's attention. Once it has acquired the target, you simply wait as it rushes the fly and the line comes tight. Once it's hooked, a big sailfish can be matched by no other fish on the planet for aerial display and speed.

By far the best way to hook any billfish is to have it take the fly as it swims away from you. The very shape of its mouth makes a head-on hookup almost impossible. Thus the boat and its crew are every bit as important as using the right fly. Experience and teamwork count for everything. So, before you plunk down your hard-earned cash and make the long trip, do a little homework and make sure you are not only booking an experienced crew, but also going at the right time of year.


Pacific sailfish tend to run large. Over 100 pounds is common, which means using a 12-weight or heavier rod and a reel with at least 300 yards of backing. More is better. I personally prefer a medium-sink line over a floater because it helps anchor the popper on the surface of the water so the sail's body wave won't push it out of the way during the attack. Sailfish are also not at all leader shy, so keep it short to make casting easier. (See the rigging illustration at top of page.)

If you've never caught a sail on fly, I suggest that you go with 30-pound test as the class tippet for the first fish. That way you'll get a chance to learn how to properly fight the critter; it would be a shame to travel so far without landing at least one.

Some areas are more seasonal than others. Guatemala is good almost all year, but the facilities are not so numerous as in Costa Rica, where the best action from January through March is along the southern half of the coast. In the summer, the northern half is better. The coastal town of Quepos, which is good almost all year round, seems to be the geographical dividing point.

Marlin

Everyone who has caught at least one sail on a fly eventually aspires to do the same with a marlin. But unless you go to those few remote hot spots where marlin of fly-rod size are available in sufficient numbers to provide good opportunities every day, it becomes a matter of luck. The same 12- to 15-weight fly rod and reel that you routinely use to catch sailfish will do the job. So will the flies. It's just a matter of being able to cast to a marlin that's not too big; 250 pounds or less is about right.

In the Pacific, striped marlin are probably your most likely target. The two most productive hot spots are Cocos Island (lying 300 miles southwest of Costa Rica, this requires a large live-aboard sportfisherman) and the Galapagos Islands, where there is a camp. Australia's barrier reef has produced black marlin under 100 pounds during the winter months.

In the Atlantic, a few white marlin have been taken on fly off North Carolina's Cape Hatteras during the early autumn months. The La Guaira Bank off Venezuela is another fall location that produces more consistent white marlin action than Hatteras, with the occasional fly-rod size blue marlin thrown into the mix. Capt. Ron Hamlin of South Fishing (www.southfishing.com) can provide info on white marlin in Venezuela.

~Ref: Bob Stearns, http://www.midcurrent.com, Aug 2010


Bob Stearns contributes to Saltwater Fly Fishing and many other angling magazines from his home in Miami, Florida. He is also the author of The Fisherman's Boating Book and the revisions author of The Saltwater Fisherman's Bible This article first appeared in Saltwater Fly Fishing magazine as part of the big-game series "Out of the Blue." Article copyright © 2005 by Bob Stearns.
featdesc::
video::[Error processing dynamic tag getCurrentAttribute("item","custitem_product_video") : record infoitem 300 not found]
sku::What is a Marlin
rating::0
Fly Category::
Fly Stage::
Fly Tying::
quantity::0
dealdaycont::
addtocart::
{{thumbnail}}
{{itemlink}}
{{desc}}
Regular Price: {{itemprice}}
Special Price: {{itemprice}}
{{addtocart}}
Log In to add this item to your Wish List.
Los Roques
234
id::234
thumbnail::
itemlink::Los Roques
desc::
itemprice::N/A
Price::
pricelevel::
baseprice::
Name::Los Roques
Rod Weight::
Rod Length::
Reel Line Weight::
Rod Action::
Series::
Featured::
Category::
Fishing::
Brand::
Rod Type::
Primary Color::
Size::
Line Weight::
type::infoitem
mediaimg::
url::http://www.lelandfly.com/In-Stock/Venezuela/Los-Roques.html
thumb::
detdesc::

LOS ROQUES


 


Los Roques is a set of small islands in the Caribbean
Sea located 80 miles north of Caracas, Venezuela.  While the area is
often referred to as an archipelago, technically Los Roques is an atoll
within the Lesser Antilles characterized by  magnificent coral beds,
diverse and varied flats, sandy beaches, clear waters and incredible
natural beauty.  The entire atoll was declared a national park in the
mid-80's and since that time there has been very little development,
thus insuring the pristine nature of the area for generations to come.


Located 11 degrees north of the equator, Los Roques' air and
water temperatures vary little throughout the season.  The area is also
characterized by a dry climate and is relatively unaffected by cold
fronts and hurricanes.  These factors make Los Roques one of the safest
bonefishing locations in the world in terms of weather and water
conditions much like Christmas Island.  Chris Yrazabal, owner of Sight
Cast, is a ten-year veteran to guiding the Los Roques region.  His
guests are housed at Vistalmar lodge, which is located only five minutes
from the airport on the atoll's largest island El Gran Roque.


 


Sight Cast Outfitters Fishing:    

With more than 250 square miles of fishable water, the Los
Roques area is wade fisherman's dream come true. While many of the more
productive flats are covered with turtle grass, coral flats and hard
sand flats also abound. 

 

Regarded primarily as a bonefish destination, the vast and varied waters
surrounding your lodge also provide ample opportunities for species
such as Barracuda, Tarpon, Jacks and Spanish mackerel.  During the prime
months of mid-January through mid-October, Los Roques offers impressive
numbers of bonefish that average 3-4 pounds.  Fish over 5 pounds are
common, and good numbers of fish in the 7-10 pound range are present. 
Fish over 10 pounds have been taken, and the lodge record is an honest
13 pounder!  Their season runs from mid-January through October.


 


Fishing is done from 28 ft fiberglass boats with one guide
and one captain per two clients.  The fishing day is approximately
8-hours, but times vary so as to hit the best tides.  If the best tides
for tailing fish are late afternoon, the fishing day may be from 10:30
a.m. to 6:30 p.m.  When anglers tire of walking the flats
or tides are not optimal for wading, anglers can fish from the boat's
casting platform.    While these boats are too large to be poled
effectively, the boatman can "walk" the boat across deeper flats, while
the guide helps anglers to spot fish from the bow.  The guides can also
take anglers to deep-water "muds," or "secret" bonefish holes where even
beginners can catch an abundance of bonefish.              

 

Sight Cast Outfitters Vistalmar Lodge Accommodation:


Lodging is at Vistalmar Lodge, which is located on the beach
of the big island of El Gran Roque.  Anglers stay in double occupancy
guestrooms, each with two standard single or double beds, ceiling fan,
air conditioners and a private bath.    There is a living room area
downstairs, and an open-air rooftop bar and lounge.  Breakfasts and
dinners are served Oceanside by an exclusive chef.  

 

Sight Cast Outfitters Travel:

You will need to make travel arrangements to Caracas, Venezuela. The
Hotel in Caracas and inner country flights are included in the package
price.  Anglers are met at the airport
(after clearing customs) by a representative of the lodges transfer
service, Grand Slam Transfers.  The employee of the transfer service
will be holding a sign with the name Sight Cast and Grand Slam.  He will
then take anglers to the Hotel.  The transfer to the hotel from the
airport should take 10 minutes.


The next morning, the transfer service will take Anglers
directly to the LTA Airline counter (usually pick up at the hotel is at
6:45 a.m.). Once there, they will need to pay US $4 each (national
departure tax).  The confirmation number for the flight will be given
(as well as an electronic ticket via mail) one month prior to arrival. 
The plane to Los Roques usually departs at 8:00 a.m. for the 35-minute
flight on a DASH 7.   Anglers can have breakfast at the airport or at
Los Roques.  The Sight Cast staff will be at the El Gran Roque airport
to meet arriving anglers.  It is then a short 3 minute walk from the
airport.


 


On the departure day the flight back to Caracas is usually at 6:00
p.m.  In Caracas Grand Slam will transfer anglers to the hotel and then
to the airport the following day. There is an $42.00 departure tax.

 


Included:

First and last over night at the selected hotel: In Caracas: Best
Western or Tamanaco and and in La Guaira: Puerto Viejo Best Western,
round trip flight Caracas - Los Roques - Caracas with LTA, Accommodation
at Vistalmar Lodge, all meals at the Lodge and at the boat, all ground
transfers, guided fishing, fishing licenses and permits.


 


Not Included:

International air to Caracas, Meals and beverages in the mainland, Los
Roques National Park, entry fee (approx. $10), alcoholic beverages
(except beers on the boat), items of a personal nature such as phone
calls and laundry, domestic departure tax (approx. $2), International
departure tax (approx. $37), gratuities to the lodge staff and fishing
guides.


 

featdesc::
video::[Error processing dynamic tag getCurrentAttribute("item","custitem_product_video") : record infoitem 234 not found]
sku::Los Roques
rating::0
Fly Category::
Fly Stage::
Fly Tying::
quantity::0
dealdaycont::
addtocart::
{{thumbnail}}
{{itemlink}}
{{desc}}
Regular Price: {{itemprice}}
Special Price: {{itemprice}}
{{addtocart}}
Log In to add this item to your Wish List.