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Leland Rod Co - Bonefish Fly Selection
Three Parts - Fish - Good Cast - Flies - these are the right flies.  Fish on! 33 Bonefish Flies.
20888
id::20888
thumbnail::Bonefish Fly Box.jpg
desc::Three Parts - Fish - Good Cast - Flies - these are the right flies.  Fish on! 33 Bonefish Flies.
itemprice::$79.95
Price::$79.95
pricelevel::$79.95
baseprice::$79.95
Name::Leland Rod Co - Bonefish Fly Selection
Rod Weight::
Rod Length::
Reel Line Weight::
Rod Action::
Series::Florida Keys
Featured::Leland Favorite
Category::Fly Box
Fishing::Bonefish
Brand::Leland Rod Company
Rod Type::Saltwater
Primary Color::
Size::
Line Weight::
type::item
mediaimg::http://www.lelandfly.com/Leland-Rod-Co-Bonefish-Fly-Selection-image.jpg
url::http://www.lelandfly.com/In-Stock/Flies/Leland-Rod-Co-Bonefish-Fly-Selection.html
thumb::http://www.lelandfly.com/Leland-Rod-Co-Bonefish-Fly-Selection-image.jpg
detdesc::
featdesc::
video::
sku::Bonefish Selection
rating::0
Fly Category::Assortments
Fly Stage::
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Red Truck 1953 8 wt 9ft Fly Rod, 4-Piece, 890-4
From Alaskan silvers to Delta largemouth, Cape Cod stripers, or Keys bonefish, the 890-4 expands horizons.
2284
id::2284
thumbnail::1953 fly rod 890.jpg
desc::From Alaskan silvers to Delta largemouth, Cape Cod stripers, or Keys bonefish, the 890-4 expands horizons.
itemprice::$199.00
Price::$199.00
pricelevel::$199.00
baseprice::$199.00
Name::Red Truck 1953 8 wt 9ft Fly Rod, 4-Piece, 890-4
Rod Weight::8 Weight
Rod Length::9 Foot
Reel Line Weight::
Rod Action::Medium/Tip-Curve
Series::1953
Featured::Proudly Made in Korea
Category::Rod
Fishing::Alaska Rainbow
Brand::Red Truck Fly Fishing
Rod Type::
Primary Color::Black
Size::
Line Weight::
type::item
mediaimg::http://www.lelandfly.com/core/media/media.nl?id=703097&c=3316021&h=182d880bd5e4e7b0afaa
url::http://www.lelandfly.com/Red-Truck-Fly-Rods/All-Purpose-Big-Game/Red-Truck-1953-8-wt-9ft-Fly-Rod-4-Piece-890-4.html
thumb::http://www.lelandfly.com/core/media/media.nl?id=703097&c=3316021&h=182d880bd5e4e7b0afaa
detdesc::What You Need in a Big Gun


For delivering bigger flies, throwing longer distances, or chasing larger fish, anglers would do well to up-size from a five weight to the 1953 890-4. This powerful four-piece eight weight is safe for saltwater use, and can handle sinking lines, sink-tips, and floating lines without a problem. From Alaskan silvers to Delta largemouth, Cape Cod stripers, or Keys bonefish, the 890-4 allows anglers to expand their fly fishing horizons to some of the tougher fish out there.
featdesc::Leland on Red Truck Fly Fishing Company With all the fly fishing tackle available today, why would Red Truck Fly Fishing Company bring to market our own offering of fly fishing gear? Our honest answer is: with over 25 years of face-to-face retail experience with you, our customer, we've learned a few important things... You told us that you were confused with the "over the top" marketing hype manufactured by our industry's big brands. You were baffled by proprietary names for graphite modulus and confused by overly complicated reel drag systems. You told us there were too many bewildering product choices and that you wanted concise answers and recommendations to your questions and fishing needs. When purchasing fly gear, you wanted to feel confident that you were making a smart investment in a product that would not be replaced next year with a "newer" version. In essence, you wanted stuff that works and was worth your hard-earned money! At Red Truck, we've listened to you and leveraged our staff's combined 300 plus years of fly fishing experience to design equipment that is strictly necessary and that raises your level of enjoyment from purchase to use. We tested this gear with hard-working, no-nonsense, professional guides who rely on their tackle in the same way as a carpenter d'es his hammer. With each project, we always asked ourselves, "D'es this product deserve to exist?" Our Red Truck fly rods embody this honest thinking. Unlike some fly rod brands that employ a myopic marketing campaign, stating their rod is the lightest, at Red Truck, we focus on the big picture. We believe in the essential characteristics of a truly good rod: balance, minimal swing weight, true-tracking, stability and efficiency. The result of this balanced rod design approach is a selection of fly rods that are a joy to cast and fish. For our Red Truck Fly Reels, we took the same angle. Instead of inventing a new marketing slant or a hyper-technical pitch, we designed reels that speak to the core reason most of us fly fish: simplicity. We wanted to offer reels that get the job done, look good while doing it and last a long time. Take apart our Red Truck Premium fly reel and you'll know in a glance how the drag systems work and more importantly, why they won't fail. Sure, all our Red Truck equipment employs the latest in quality materials and manufacturing. Heck, we even work in titanium when necessary. But we never push any unproven concept or pseudo-technology, especially when we deem it unnecessary. At Red Truck, we believe that fly fishing should be fun and that your fly tackle should always work as intended. We like fishing memories of friends, dusty handshakes, wet dogs, great casts, beautiful places and even a fish or two. We design gear that takes you into the outdoors and gets the job done in the field, every time.
video::
sku::1953-890-4
rating::0
Fly Category::
Fly Stage::
Fly Tying::
quantity::31
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Red Truck 1953 Fly Rod Combo, 4 Piece, 890-4
A big game package with the functionality and features to tangle with the toughest fish in fresh and salt water.
11711
id::11711
thumbnail::1953 890 combo.jpg
desc::A big game package with the functionality and features to tangle with the toughest fish in fresh and salt water.
itemprice::$299.00
Price::$299.00
pricelevel::$299.00
baseprice::$299.00
Name::Red Truck 1953 Fly Rod Combo, 4 Piece, 890-4
Rod Weight::8 Weight
Rod Length::9 Foot
Reel Line Weight::
Rod Action::Medium/Tip-Curve
Series::1953
Featured::Proudly Made in Korea
Category::Outfit
Fishing::Alaska Rainbow
Brand::Red Truck Fly Fishing
Rod Type::Freshwater
Primary Color::Black
Size::
Line Weight::
type::item
mediaimg::http://www.lelandfly.com/core/media/media.nl?id=703091&c=3316021&h=489b1ceda1a78e09f474
url::http://www.lelandfly.com/Red-Truck-Fly-Rods/All_2/Red-Truck-1953-Fly-Rod-Combo-4-Piece-890-4.html
thumb::http://www.lelandfly.com/core/media/media.nl?id=703091&c=3316021&h=489b1ceda1a78e09f474
detdesc::Leland on the Red Truck 1953 890-4 Big Game Package


All you need to fish for bonefish or silvers or anything in between, packaged conveniently in a durable cordura rod/reel tube, and leagues beyond anything else available in the entry level category: that's the Red Truck 1953 890-4 Big Game Package.



Starting with a powerful and stable nine foot eight weight, saltwater-safe fly rod, the 1953 890-4 package presents new saltwater anglers (or freshwater veterans that dabble in the salt) with a function-forward tool for pursuing hard core gamefish.



Built of black-anodized aluminum and featuring an adjustable disc drag, the Red Truck Big Game Fly Reel provides the rigidity and resistance necessary to bring powerful fish to hand.



The included Airflo Velocity weight-forward 8wt floating fly line (WF8F) features a powerful front taper that makes quick work of lead-eyed streamers, wind-resistant bass bugs, and whatever else you might choose to put in the way of an angry predator.
featdesc::Leland on Red Truck Fly Fishing Company With all the fly fishing tackle available today, why would Red Truck Fly Fishing Company bring to market our own offering of fly fishing gear? Our honest answer is: with over 25 years of face-to-face retail experience with you, our customer, we've learned a few important things... You told us that you were confused with the "over the top" marketing hype manufactured by our industry's big brands. You were baffled by proprietary names for graphite modulus and confused by overly complicated reel drag systems. You told us there were too many bewildering product choices and that you wanted concise answers and recommendations to your questions and fishing needs. When purchasing fly gear, you wanted to feel confident that you were making a smart investment in a product that would not be replaced next year with a "newer" version. In essence, you wanted stuff that works and was worth your hard-earned money! At Red Truck, we've listened to you and leveraged our staff's combined 300 plus years of fly fishing experience to design equipment that is strictly necessary and that raises your level of enjoyment from purchase to use. We tested this gear with hard-working, no-nonsense, professional guides who rely on their tackle in the same way as a carpenter d'es his hammer. With each project, we always asked ourselves, "D'es this product deserve to exist?" Our Red Truck fly rods embody this honest thinking. Unlike some fly rod brands that employ a myopic marketing campaign, stating their rod is the lightest, at Red Truck, we focus on the big picture. We believe in the essential characteristics of a truly good rod: balance, minimal swing weight, true-tracking, stability and efficiency. The result of this balanced rod design approach is a selection of fly rods that are a joy to cast and fish. For our Red Truck Fly Reels, we took the same angle. Instead of inventing a new marketing slant or a hyper-technical pitch, we designed reels that speak to the core reason most of us fly fish: simplicity. We wanted to offer reels that get the job done, look good while doing it and last a long time. Take apart our Red Truck Premium fly reel and you'll know in a glance how the drag systems work and more importantly, why they won't fail. Sure, all our Red Truck equipment employs the latest in quality materials and manufacturing. Heck, we even work in titanium when necessary. But we never push any unproven concept or pseudo-technology, especially when we deem it unnecessary. At Red Truck, we believe that fly fishing should be fun and that your fly tackle should always work as intended. We like fishing memories of friends, dusty handshakes, wet dogs, great casts, beautiful places and even a fish or two. We design gear that takes you into the outdoors and gets the job done in the field, every time.
video::
sku::1953-890-Combo
rating::0
Fly Category::
Fly Stage::
Fly Tying::
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Loop Opti Runner Fly Fishing Reel
The Opti Runner fly reel is perfectly at home on lighter two-handers and bonefish fly rods alike.
14181
id::14181
thumbnail::loop_limited_edition_opti_runner_reel_1.jpg
desc::The Opti Runner fly reel is perfectly at home on lighter two-handers and bonefish fly rods alike.
itemprice::$702.00
Price::$702.00
pricelevel::$702.00
baseprice::$702.00
Name::Loop Opti Runner Fly Fishing Reel
Rod Weight::
Rod Length::
Reel Line Weight::6-7 Weight
Rod Action::
Series::Opti
Featured::
Category::Reel
Fishing::Steelhead Switch
Brand::Loop
Rod Type::
Primary Color::Red
Size::
Line Weight::
type::item
mediaimg::http://www.lelandfly.com/Loop-Opti-Runner-Fly-Fishing-Reel-image.jpg
url::http://www.lelandfly.com/Loop-Pro-Store/Opti_2/Loop-Opti-Runner-Fly-Fishing-Reel.html
thumb::http://www.lelandfly.com/Loop-Opti-Runner-Fly-Fishing-Reel-image.jpg
detdesc::


Loop Limited Edition Opti Runner Fly Fishing Reel, Leland Exclusive


 



Loop's recent stateside success is something anglers everywhere can

celebrate. At Leland Fly Fishing Outfitters, we are offering an

exclusive selection of Opti Series Fly Reels to commemorate this

long-overdue induction into the American angling tradition. Brilliantly

anodized in red and blue with chrome detailing, the Limited Edition Opti

Series for Leland is a testament to America's fly fishing havens and

the diehards that fish them. Custom designed by Loop and produced in

extremely limited quantities, the new Loop Optis are sold exclusively

through Leland and unite Swedish innovation with a colorway we can all

appreciate.


 







 




Regardless of whether you're spot

fishing for Colorado cutthroat or scanning the flats for bonefish

silhouettes, the sound of the Loop Opti Runner Fly Fishing Reel when

a fish takes your line will leave you at the mercy of your adrenal

glands. Packed with power and precisely machined from aircraft-grade

aluminum, the Loop Opti Runner Fly Fishing Reel produces an outgoing

click that serenades the anxious angler with the promise of success.

With its Power Matrix drag system and a sleek design that typifies

Loop's cutting-edge design, the Loop Opti Runner Fly Fishing Reel is

a masterful example of fly fishing tackle at its finest.
featdesc::
  • Line: #5-8
  • Diameter: 4.5 inch
  • Inner Width: 0.9 inch
  • Capacity: WF7+150yd 30lbs
  • Weight: 7.2 oz.
video::
sku::ORU-L-RED
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Fly Category::
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Fly Tying::
quantity::3
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What is Fly Line
Fly line is a common term for the weighted line that, in conjunction with a fly rod and reel, delivers the relatively weightless fly fishing lure, or fly, to the targeted game fish in the sport o f fly fishing. As described by the 17th Century fly angler and writer, Sir Izaak Walton, and others, fly fishing line originated as spun or braided lengths of natural silk. Although these early silken fly lines were quite effective, they were not known for their ability to cast flies long distances or for a lasting overall durability.
64
id::64
thumbnail::400-fly-fishing-for-trout.jpg
desc::Fly line is a common term for the weighted line that, in conjunction with a fly rod and reel, delivers the relatively weightless fly fishing lure, or fly, to the targeted game fish in the sport o f fly fishing. As described by the 17th Century fly angler and writer, Sir Izaak Walton, and others, fly fishing line originated as spun or braided lengths of natural silk. Although these early silken fly lines were quite effective, they were not known for their ability to cast flies long distances or for a lasting overall durability.
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Name::What is Fly Line
Rod Weight::
Rod Length::
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Rod Action::
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Featured::
Category::
Fishing::
Brand::
Rod Type::
Primary Color::
Size::
Line Weight::
type::infoitem
mediaimg::http://www.lelandfly.com/What_is_a_fly_line_2.jpg
url::http://www.lelandfly.com/In-Stock/Fly-Fishing-Terms/What-is-Fly-Line.html
thumb::http://www.lelandfly.com/400-fly-fishing-for-trout.jpg
detdesc::What is Fly Line?

Fly line is a common term for the weighted line that, in conjunction with a fly rod and reel, delivers the relatively weightless fly fishing lure, or fly, to the targeted game fish in the sport of fly fishing. As described by the 17th Century fly angler and writer, Sir Izaak Walton, and others, fly fishing line originated as spun or braided lengths of natural silk. Although these early silken fly lines were quite effective, they were not known for their ability to cast flies long distances or for a lasting overall durability.


Since fly fishing's earliest period of development, fly line has grown and morphed into a highly sophisticated component of an angler's tackle strategy. Today, fly lines are available in a wide range of styles and designs; the prevailing theory in modern fly fishing is to match the functional design of a fly line with distinct fishing situations and/or targeted fish species.

Accordingly, there are several common varieties of fly line: full-floating fly lines, partial-float fly lines, sinking fly lines of varying sink rates, full-sinking lines, and a range of specialty lines that are too numerous to mention. The most commonly utilized fly line type, however, is the full-floating line, a line designed to sit atop the water's surface for the full length of the line. Full-floating lines are often referred to informally as "full-floaters" and are the best choice for all-round fishing situations and are perfect for the execution of classic dry fly fishing techniques.
featdesc::MODERN FLY LINE CONSTRUCTION

Today's fly lines range in length from 80 to 105 feet and are constructed of a single-stranded, spun, or braided synthetic core material and a high-tech plastic coating. The stiffness of the core material is of paramount importance when considering the climate of your fishing destination. Softer and more supple materials are perfect for colder weather, while stiffer braids excel in warmer climates. Selecting the right core stiffness will ensure that loose loops or tight coils between your guides will not hamper your cast.

Floating fly fishing lines are able to actually float because they are less dense than water. During the construction of a floating fly line, hollow microspheres imbedded in the PVC plastic coating, lowering the overall density of the line while maintaining the line's unique shape or "taper." Sinking fly lines are more dense than water and are constructed in the opposite way than floating lines. A sinking line's construction generally employs a coating of varying amounts of tungsten mixed with the plastic. Different ratios of PVC to tungsten yield different sink rates, a technology that has created a new market for highly specialized sinking lines, especially for striped bass and steelhead fly fishing which often require the use of sub-surface streamers, wet flies, and nymphs for successful results.


FLY LINE WEIGHT

Fly lines range from the very thinnest and lightest for making short casts with tiny flies with tiny rods on small water, up to the heaviest, thickest fly lines designed to cast over-foot-long, massive flies with powerful big-game fly rods to catch giant fish in the ocean. All fly lines are numbered, on a universally accepted scale, by the physical weight of the first 30 feet of the forward, delivery end of the fly line; the bigger the number, the heavier the fly line. Fly rods are numbered in the same way, to balance the proper line weight with the rod's relative flex or stiffness. The heavier the fly line, and the respective fly rod, the greater the capability of casting larger flies, combatting the effects of wind, and, up to a point, casting greater distances. So, in a sense, the fishes that we pursue actually determine what line weights we anglers use to catch them. The fish prefers natural foods of a certain size range, and we try to select the line weight that is best able to a cast our hand-tied imitations of that food in a manner that, hopefully, won't scare the fish.

The smallest fly lines are the ultra-light lines, all floating, a category created in recent years for those that enjoy fishing with the lightest tackle conceivable. Ultra-light fly lines range from the tiniest, 3/0, or '000', to '0' or zero. From there, fly lines are numbered by weight from '1' to '15'. Line weights 1 to 3 are still pretty "light" and are generally used by anglers that fish primarily on sheltered, small water with small flies.

Most trout fly anglers prefer to use either a 4, 5, or 6 weight fly line, and the correctly matched fly rod, for most of their all-around trout fishing. The 4 weight would be for an angler that fishes small to medium water with smaller flies. The 5 weight line and rod combination is the most popular, by far, and should be considered the all-around choice for fishing most sizes of trout flies on most trout water. The 6 weight line and rod may benefit trout anglers fishing larger rivers, in wind, or casting larger weighted nymphs and bigger dry flies.

Although these categories are somewhat arbitrary, as all anglers have their individual sense of technique and style, some other general recommendations would be 6 or 7 weight for smallmouth bass, 7 to 9 weight for largemouth, 7 to 10 weight for steelhead and salmon, and 8 to 10 weight for striped bass. Although some saltwater light tackle enthusiasts are now picking up the 6 weight, most saltwater flats folks use 7 to 10 weights for speckled trout, redfish, bonefish, permit, and many other small to medium salt water species. The 11 to 15 line weight category is in the realm of giant ocean critters, from fifty to several hundred pounds. The bigger line weights, once again, are for casting progressively larger flies.


FLY LINE TYPES

Weight Forward Fly Lines

Most trout fishing and other typical fly fishing situations call for a floating, weight forward fly line. These tapers are designed to carry the greatest mass at the front of the line, exploiting the laws of physics to send casts outward and load rods quickly and easily. Weight forward tapers are the most versatile of the bunch, covering fishing situations requiring everything from delicate dries to monstrous blue water flies. Depending on application, the length of the head on weight forward tapers varies widely, from massive, thick bass tapers under 28' in head length that turn over huge, wind resistant flies, to long belly steelhead lines with heads over 65' in length to allow line control at greater distances. However, most freshwater and saltwater anglers use weight forward fly lines with head lengths from 30' to 45'.

Shooting heads

Shooting heads are very short fly lines, 24' to 41' in length, designed to be cast, or "shot," the greatest distances using fast action fly rods with minimal false casting and minimal backcast room. The shooting head is attached, usually by a loop-to-loop connection for a quick, convenient exchange, to a thin running line that has minimal surface contact with the fly rod guides, thus achieving the long distance casts. When considering the geometric taper of a shooting head, think "cannonball at the end of a string." Shooting heads are also usually designed to sink, and a selection of various densities allow the angler, with one reel and spool, to fish a variety of water depths and water speeds. Shooting head systems are most often used by steelhead and salmon anglers, with either single-handed and Spey rods. Lake fly anglers as well as striper fly fishers will also benefit from casting a shooting head system.

Spey Lines

Spey Fly Lines are used with Spey, or double handed rods. Spey rods range from 11' to over 18' in length and the most powerful of these, in the hands of an expert, are able to unleash casts sometimes approaching 200 feet! Spey rods are typically seen on steelhead and salmon rivers, but the recent leap in the popularity of Spey casting and fishing finds them on trout rivers, lakes and saltwater, as well. Spey fly lines are much thicker and heavier throughout their taper, can be longer than their single-handed cousins and have their own numbering system; so an 8 weight Spey line, for example, is a lot bigger than an 8 weight standard, or single-handed fly line. There are many styles of Spey casting that exist today. For traditional Spey casting, making longer, fixed distance, D-loop casts choose a longer belly (57 - 71' head length) spey line such as the RIO PowerSpey. The Scandinavians have developed their own overhead casting method of Spey using very fast action rods and very short (31 - 40'), shooting head Spey lines attached to thin running lines.

Currently, the most popular Spey lines used in the States have head lengths, more or less, (34 - 56') that fall between these two previous categories. The RIO Skagit and Windcutter lines are considered by many to be the easiest of the Spey lines to learn with and are also preferred by the majority of experienced Spey anglers to match the conditions encountered on many North American steelhead rivers. The utmost in Spey versatility, however, is offered by a fly line system with interchangeable floating and sinking tips when Spey casting in a variety of conditions.

Sinking Fly Lines

There are two main categories of sinking fly lines: sink-tips and full-sinking lines. Sink-tips are sinking lines designed to only allow the tip to sink below the water's surface, and are quite useful for controlled subsurface fly fishing situations. Full-sinking fly lines, as the name implies, sink for their entire length. Full-sink lines are most often used for fishing flies in still water; lakes and ponds, or slow moving rivers are the favored full-sinker fishing environments. Flies cast and fished by sinking fly lines are usually retrieved, or “stripped” in by the angler to imitate prey swimming through the water. Both sink-tip and full-sink lines come in a range of densities for fishing at different depths in the water column, from a few inches below the waters surface, to over twenty feet deep.

The industry of fly fishing seems to be overdeveloping and overproducing too many product choices these days. This is very true when it comes to fly lines. To remain relevant, fly line manufacturers are creating specialty fly lines with unique tapers for just about every conceivable fishing situation. Even with good intentions, the result is an explosion of fly line choices and no clear solution for you the angler. At Leland, we've taken the time to cast and fish all available fly lines. We've assembled what we consider to be a selection of the best fly lines available today, using the criteria of casting enjoyment and fishing function.
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Red Truck 1953 Tip, Tip Section, 890-4
From Alaskan silvers to Delta largemouth, Cape Cod stripers, or Keys bonefish, the 890-4 allows anglers to expand their fly fishing horizons.
2283
id::2283
thumbnail::1953 fly rod 890 tip.jpg
desc::From Alaskan silvers to Delta largemouth, Cape Cod stripers, or Keys bonefish, the 890-4 allows anglers to expand their fly fishing horizons.
itemprice::$30.00
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pricelevel::$30.00
baseprice::$30.00
Name::Red Truck 1953 Tip, Tip Section, 890-4
Rod Weight::8 Weight
Rod Length::
Reel Line Weight::
Rod Action::
Series::1953
Featured::
Category::Rod
Fishing::Alaska Rainbow
Brand::Red Truck Fly Fishing
Rod Type::
Primary Color::
Size::
Line Weight::
type::item
mediaimg::http://www.lelandfly.com/core/media/media.nl?id=703102&c=3316021&h=9b733562383c5f8fa8eb
url::http://www.lelandfly.com/Red-Truck-Fly-Rods/All-Purpose-Big-Game/Red-Truck-1953-Tip-Tip-Section-890-4.html
thumb::http://www.lelandfly.com/core/media/media.nl?id=703102&c=3316021&h=9b733562383c5f8fa8eb
detdesc::

What You Need in a Big Gun

For delivering bigger flies, throwing longer distances, or chasing larger fish, anglers would do well to up-size from a five weight to the 1953 890-4. This powerful four-piece eight weight is safe for saltwater use, and can handle sinking lines, sink-tips, and floating lines without a problem. From Alaskan silvers to Delta largemouth, Cape Cod stripers, or Keys bonefish, the 890-4 allows anglers to expand their fly fishing horizons to some of the tougher fish out there.




featdesc::Leland on Red Truck Fly Fishing Company With all the fly fishing tackle available today, why would Red Truck Fly Fishing Company bring to market our own offering of fly fishing gear? Our honest answer is: with over 25 years of face-to-face retail experience with you, our customer, we've learned a few important things... You told us that you were confused with the "over the top" marketing hype manufactured by our industry's big brands. You were baffled by proprietary names for graphite modulus and confused by overly complicated reel drag systems. You told us there were too many bewildering product choices and that you wanted concise answers and recommendations to your questions and fishing needs. When purchasing fly gear, you wanted to feel confident that you were making a smart investment in a product that would not be replaced next year with a "newer" version. In essence, you wanted stuff that works and was worth your hard-earned money! At Red Truck, we've listened to you and leveraged our staff's combined 300 plus years of fly fishing experience to design equipment that is strictly necessary and that raises your level of enjoyment from purchase to use. We tested this gear with hard-working, no-nonsense, professional guides who rely on their tackle in the same way as a carpenter d'es his hammer. With each project, we always asked ourselves, "D'es this product deserve to exist?" Our Red Truck fly rods embody this honest thinking. Unlike some fly rod brands that employ a myopic marketing campaign, stating their rod is the lightest, at Red Truck, we focus on the big picture. We believe in the essential characteristics of a truly good rod: balance, minimal swing weight, true-tracking, stability and efficiency. The result of this balanced rod design approach is a selection of fly rods that are a joy to cast and fish. For our Red Truck Fly Reels, we took the same angle. Instead of inventing a new marketing slant or a hyper-technical pitch, we designed reels that speak to the core reason most of us fly fish: simplicity. We wanted to offer reels that get the job done, look good while doing it and last a long time. Take apart our Red Truck Premium fly reel and you'll know in a glance how the drag systems work and more importantly, why they won't fail. Sure, all our Red Truck equipment employs the latest in quality materials and manufacturing. Heck, we even work in titanium when necessary. But we never push any unproven concept or pseudo-technology, especially when we deem it unnecessary. At Red Truck, we believe that fly fishing should be fun and that your fly tackle should always work as intended. We like fishing memories of friends, dusty handshakes, wet dogs, great casts, beautiful places and even a fish or two. We design gear that takes you into the outdoors and gets the job done in the field, every time.
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Choosing the Right Spey Fly Line
333
id::333
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Understanding Spey Fly Fishing Lines

Until recently, two-handed rods were used almost exclusively in the pursuit of steelhead and salmon on the rivers of the British Isles, Scandinavia, and Canada. In the last five years, however, the popularity of Spey rods on our own steelhead and trout streams has exploded. In fact it’s not unusual today to see anglers applying two-handed techniques on lakes, flats and in the surf.

What would influence these fly fishers to trade their favorite single-handers for longer rods? Spey fly lines, and the rods that cast them, offer many potential advantages: greater casting distance, greater line control, more precise mending at longer distance, and the ability to operate with little back-casting room. These tools enable an angler to cover more water with less effort and less fatigue. And on larger rivers, you can reach areas that would be virtually unfishable with single-handed lines and rods. And let’s not forget the enjoyment and excitement of learning new skills that add to your proficiency on the water!

Because anglers are doing a lot more with Spey techniques these days, Spey fly line designs are evolving so rapidly, even experienced spey folks have trouble keeping up, let alone beginners!  We at Leland have chosen RIO Products as our primary source of spey fly fishing lines. RIO has virtually led the way in revolutionizing fly line designs for Spey anglers in North America and across the world. Since there are so many styles of spey casting and corresponding spey line designs, who better than Simon Gawesworth, RIO fly line designer, former Captain of England’s World Fly Fishing Championships team, author, all-around nice guy, and one of the world’s leading authorities on spey casting to explain the ins and outs of modern spey lines? Read on and you'll get the best synopsis we've ever seen on modern spey lines from the man himself, code named 'SpeyBro'.

 

UNDERSTANDING SPEY LINES 2008

by Simon Gawesworth of RIO Products

'A newcomer to spey casting would be forgiven for peeping into this sport, trying it out or talking to the many different opinions and then turning tail and running away from the mass of confusion that there is out there.'

'There is a mind boggling array of theories, techniques, tackle and styles and it is very difficult for the beginner to make head or tail out of the world of spey casting. To explain the subtleties and intricacies of this spey world would be like trying to explain the rules of cricket to the average American, or of baseball to the average Brit. However, as fly line manufacturers, we only need to make it easier to understand the fly line – the most important part of your tackle.' 

Weight

Let’s start with a look at spey line weights. Perhaps the greatest confusion lies in the rating of two-handed rods and lines. Most fly fishers are familiar with the rating of a single handed rod – choose a #5 rod for trout, a #8 rod for bonefish and a #12 rod for tarpon. Two-handed rods also have a similar rating – somewhere between #5 and #12, but the 8 weight fly line that loads your bonefish rod will never get close to loading a #8 two handed rod. The reason for this is that two handed rods are far more powerful than an equivalent rated single handed rod.

A single handed rod, rated for a #8 line, loads effectively with between 200 and 300 grains. A #8 two-handed rod will take between 450 and 600 grains to load for spey casting. This large range is due to the spey casting style used. At this stage there is no need to confuse anyone more with the differences in these styles, just remember that the two-handed rod needs more weight to make it load. In other words, if you put a regular WF8 line on a #8 two-handed rod you will never get close to loading it.

One confusing thing about spey lines is that most of them have more than one line number as a “size”. The WindCutter lines have three numbers such as 7/8/9, 8/9/10 and 9/10/11. The reason for this triple numbering system is that the first WindCutter line designed by Jim Vincent, was made by taking the body of a #10 line, adding some of a #9 to the front end and then finishing it off with the full front taper of a #8, thus the line became an 8/9/10. The numbering system stuck. As a simple guideline, use the middle number of the three to find out what line size it is – the 8/9/10 is a good #9 line.

The AFS and PowerSpey lines only have two numbers – 7/8, 8/9 and 9/10 for example and in these cases, generally use the higher number. The 8/9 is, in effect a #9 line. To help choose the right line for your rod, we have compiled a chart that recommends the right lines for spey rods. (Please
See Rio's Spey Line Recommendation Chart for all of Leland Spey Rods)
 
AFTMA Standard

Okay, so how confused do you want to be? In an attempt to illustrate the difference in line weights between the single handed AFTMA standard and the two handed AFTMA standard the following charts might be helpful. On the other hand, they might cause you to go cross eyed and reach for the nearest bottle of Single Malt!

The AFTMA standard is an attempt to standardize line weights so that whichever line manufacturer you buy a fly line from you know that they will all weigh about the same and load the rod equally – that is, of course, assuming line manufacturers manufacture lines to the AFTMA standard.

Before you look at the charts you need to understand that the two handed standard actually has four different categories: H, S, M and L. More than regular casting the head length of the line in spey casting influences the weight. So, we have four standards (for ease of recognition RIO’s appropriate Spey line is listed after the category):

‘H’ is for shooting Heads and is measured at 40 ft.
- AFS head and AFS OutBound

‘S’ is for Short belly spey lines and is measured at 55 ft
- WindCutter

‘M’ is for Mid length belly lines and is measured at 65 ft - PowerSpey

‘L’ is for Long belly spey lines and is measured at 75 ft.

So, depending on how long the belly of the spey line is, the “weigh point” falls at different lengths. The AFTMA single handed designation is measured at 30 feet.

Now that everyone is clear on that, let’s look at the AFTMA Standards (the numbers represent the weight in grains at the “weigh point”)!


Size    Single
  Hand 
    H      S     M    L

       
 #5   140       ---   380     ---   ---
 #6   160   250   420   460  600
 #7   185    300   470   510  650
 #8   210   360   530   570  710
 #9   240   430    600   640  780
#10   280   510   680   720  860
#11   330   600     770      810      950      
#12   380   700   870   910 1050


Oh, a final thing to remember is that the two handed standard has a plus or minus tolerance of 30 grains, while the single handed standard has a tolerance of plus or minus 6 to 12 grains (depending on the size). Thus you could have a spey line labeled S8 and it would be acceptable if it weighed between 500 and 560 grains.

As yet, there is no AFTMA Standard for Skagit type lines.

Taper

Most spey lines follow a simply designed taper. There needs to be weight in the back of the belly to load the rod effectively as a “D-loop”. There also needs to be a long fine front taper, so that the line lying on the water (“The Anchor”) at the start of the forward cast has as little drag as possible.

In a spey cast the “D-loop” (from A to B) loads the rod and needs to be the heaviest part of the line. The “Anchor” (B to C) lies on the water. The more line there is lying on the water, the more energy is lost during the forward cast as it tries to tear itself off the surface film.


A typical spey line design will have most of the weight in the back end of the head and a long, fine front taper to make the most of these casting requirements:



Within the basic spey line design are numerous variations, but the main one to compare is the head length. At RIO we make three different head lengths of spey lines. These are the the AFS, (Advanced Flight Spey) line, both as a Shooting Head and as an integrated shooting head, with a head length between 31 ft and 40 ft, the Windcutter, with a head length of between 45 ft and 56 ft and the PowerSpey™, with a head length of between 57 ft and 71 ft.

The longer the head of the spey line, the more line there needs to be outside the rod to make a cast. Longer belly lines, like the PowerSpey, really need plenty of room behind them to create a big enough D-loop for the line to load the rod – say 30 ft of room for an effortless cast. With the short to medium head length of the Windcutter, you may only need around 15 ft of room behind and with a short head line like the AFS, even less; perhaps only 8 ft of space is needed.

Of course, space behind isn’t the only factor. There are four other factors that influence your choice of head length:

1. Casting Ability - you need to be a better caster to handle the longer head length lines.

2. Rod Length – A short rod does not have the same lift as a long rod, so the shorter the rod, the shorter the line head length must be.

3. Sinking Tip – with sink tips or heavy flies it can be really tricky to get the sunken line to the surface with a long belly line. A short head line means that the sink tip is closer to you and easier to get out of the water.

4. Stripping flies – Some fishing techniques require you to strip the fly in to entice a fish to take. The short head lines are perfect for this as you must strip the start of the head up to the rod tip before making a cast.

If you don’t need to strip line, the short belly lines are more of a problem and a good caster will have to manage the slack coils of running line hanging in the water before each cast. They will also waste good fishing time having to strip the line into the casting length.

Line Taper Comparisons



Generally, if you start with a WindCutter line and, with practice, get to a skill level where you can cast the whole head at the tip of the rod, without stripping anything in, you are ready to move up to a PowerSpey line. When you do, make sure you start with the head about 12 feet in side the rod tip; this will be similar to the WindCutter you are used to.

SKAGIT CASTING

The most recent style of spey casting is called Skagit casting (pronounced ska-jit) and named after the Skagit river in Washington.

This style of spey casting utilizes an even shorter head length spey line than the WindCutter - something in the region of 27 ft. This exceptionally short head length allows the fly caster to make long casts in extremely tight situations. Even the most basic of spey casters can make a 70 ft cast with no more than 3 ft of room behind. Added to the shortness of the line is the fact that the head weighs about the same amount as the corresponding WindCutter, but at half the length. This means that the Skagit line has almost twice the weight per inch of the WindCutter line. This extra weight per inch is an immense asset for lifting out deeply sunken tips or heavy, large flies. Nothing will pick up big flies or T-14 or LC13 style sink tips as easily as a Skagit line will.


Skagit Cheaters

The most confusion with Skagit lines comes with something called “Skagit Cheaters”, which are 2½ ft, 5 ft and 7½ ft extension pieces for a Skagit line.

One of the ideas behind Skagit casting is that you want to maintain a constant ratio between the rod length and the head length of the line. It maybe 3 times the rod length, it may be 4 times the rod length, and each caster will find their happy ratio.
 
For the purpose of this example, let’s say a caster likes a ratio of 3½:1. A 12 ft rod would require 42 ft of line and a 15 ft rod will require 52½ ft. By following this ratio, it means that the caster never needs to adjust their casting stroke, regardless of which outfit they pick up.

If a caster likes this ratio and uses a 12 ft rod, they are going to need 42 ft of line to feel comfortable. The Skagit line has a 27 ft head. Add a 15 ft sink tip and you get 42 ft, which means there is no cheater needed. The next day, the same caster casts a 14 ft rod - 14 x 3½ = 49 ft. So, to keep the same casting stroke, the caster needs a total head length around 49 ft. A 27 ft Skagit line, plus the 15 ft sink tip is only 42 ft. Plug in the 7½ ft Cheater and the head length becomes 49½ ft and much closer to the required ratio.

The whole idea is pretty confusing to a novice, but once the concept is grasped, it is very easy to understand and allows for a caster to develop a consistent style, regardless of the size of rod used.

A final note to mention on the Skagit lines is that the sink tip does not form part of the calculation for line weight. If you look at the spey line recommendation chart and decide on a Skagit line for your rod, make sure you use the weight of the Skagit body. If the chart suggests you need a 550 grain Skagit line, it does not matter which size sink tip you add on to the front end of this (as long as it is not heavier than the Skagit body). The reason for this is that the sink tip usually does not form part of the D-loop and, therefore, plays no role in loading the rod. A typical example is that someone is told that they need a 550 grain Skagit line. They know they are going to use a 150 grain sink tip, so they buy a 400 grain Skagit line (thinking that the two added together will give them the correct load). This is very wrong and will result in an under loaded outfit. Make sure the Skagit body weight is correct, regardless of the sink tip.

SALTWATER

More and more people are using two-handed rods for overhead casting in the surf these days. The length and power of these rods are great for throwing big flies out against a wind and over incoming surf.

When choosing a line for overhead casting a two-handed rod there are two important considerations.

1. The head length needs to be shorter than for spey casting so that the back loop does not drop and line speed is retained to shoot big distances.

2. The line weight should be less with an overhead cast, than with a spey cast. Here’s why:


With a spey cast, only part of the line weight loads the rod. In this example the load really comes from A to B, though B to C also helps load the rod. The piece of line from C to D really has no effect on the load of the rod.




With an overhead cast, the entire weight of the line serves to load the rod at the end of the back cast. This means that a lighter line can be used when overhead casting, as opposed to when spey casting, because the entire line length (A to B) loads the rod.






An ideal line for overhead casting a two-handed rod is RIO’s OutBound®.



The Outbound is available in several densities and sizes, but the most popular one for overhead casting, particularly in the surf, is the intermediate version.
 

TIP 2 -RIO WINDCUTTER

 
Rio's Windcutter VersiTip Linesare unique in the fly fishing world. Nobody else makes a spey line with three sections. These three sections are:

1. a body section
2. a middle section (Tip 2)
3. and the front tip (Tip 1)





There are a number of reasons for these three sections:

1. For normal spey casting simply change out Tip 1 with whichever sink tips is required for the fishing conditions. Each sink tip in the wallet will weigh the same, which ensures the casting is not affected and the line remains balanced. However, each sink tip has a different sink rate from the clear intermediate tip, with a sink rate of 1½ inches per second, to the Type 8, density compensated tip which sinks at 8 inches per second.

2. For overhead casting, when a shorter and lighter weight head is needed, simply remove Tip 2 completely and attach the sink tip, or tip 1 directly to the body.

3. Sometimes extra depth is required and many fly fishers use RIO’s long 24 ft density compensated sink tips called Big Boys. These tips are too long to simply replace Tip 1, so when using longer sinking tips like this, again remove Tip 2 and attach the long tip directly to the body.

4. One odd-looking tip in the wallet is grey and has two loops on. This tip is called a sink tip compensator. The sink tip compensator is a sinking Tip 2. Replace the floating tip 2 with this compensator when fishing in strong currents. By lengthening the sinking portion of the line, the current has much less “lift” effect and ensures that the fly stays deep.

5. On really windy days, or with big, cumbersome flies, remove Tip 1 and attach the leader directly to Tip 2. This shorter taper and heavier front end makes light work of the windiest of conditions and the biggest of flies.

T-8, T-11 & T-14

T-8, T-11 & T-14 are level shooting head materials. T-8 weighs 8 grains per foot, T-11 weighs 11 grains per foot and T-14 weighs 14 grains per foot.T-8 has a sink rate of 7 inches per second, T-11 at 8 inches per second and T-14 around 9 inches per second and.

The material is usually sold in a 30 ft pack. Anglers simply cut this level material to the length they need for a variety of fishing conditions, and then add a braided loop to each end to easily attach to the spey line. The most useful tip lengths from a 30 ft pack are 15 ft, 10 ft and 5 ft, though some anglers prefer 15 ft, 9 ft and 6 ft lengths.

The weight of T-14 makes it pretty heavy for the lighter lines to lift out. Most of the Skagit line sizes will not have a problem with 15 ft of T-14, but attaching it to the lighter WindCutter and PowerSpey lines can result in poor turnover and inefficient casts. As a simple guideline, use T-14 for the spey lines of #9 and bigger, T-11 for the #7 to #9 sizes and use T-8 for the lighter line sizes.

Which Spey line should I choose?

With the array of spey lines on the market it is a little baffling to know which one to choose. Hopefully this document has at least given you an idea behind the different line designs. Following is a description of each line we make and their particular advantages: 

Outbound®
Overhead casting - particularly useful in the salt or in lakes. It is available in 6 densities: Floating, Hover (1” per second), Intermediate, Sink 3 (3” per second), Sink 6 (6” per second) and Sink 8 (8” per second). Three adaptable versions with a level T-8, T-11 and T-14 head are designed to be cut to the perfect head weight and length for individual casting styles. The intermediate OutBound is made up to a WF14 (600 grains) size and is perfect for the larger rods of #10 and bigger.

AFS Shooting Head  – NEW for 2008
An excellent presentation line that is very easy to cast. There are four different densities available:

1. F. A full floating line between a 4/5 weight (300 grains, 19 grams - 31 ft, 9.5 m in length) and a 10/11 weight (640 grains, 42 grams – 40 ft, 12.2 m in length). The head is a subtle olive color that will not spook fish in clear water, but the rear 15 ft is yellow so the angler can gauge the line’s swing. For anglers needing an easier color line to see there is also a Steelhead Orange floating AFS head.

2. F/I. A floating line with a 15 ft intermediate sinking tip. This line starts at a 7/8 (460 grains, 30 grams – 37 ft, 11.2 m in length) and goes to 10/11.

3. S1. A slow sinking head. The same weight range as the F/I but the whole head has a very slow sink rate of 1” per second. This is an excellent choice for cooler water conditions when fishing for Atlantic salmon. It is also a very good fish catching line for summer run steelhead, particularly on the Deschutes. Sizes 7/8 to 10/11.

4. S4. A full sinking head with a sink rate of 4” per second. This fast sinking head is a great line for early season and back-end Atlantic salmon and particularly good for winter steelhead. It is one of the easiest casting and fishiest sinking lines ever made. It comes in the same sizes as the “F/I” and the “I” heads. Sizes 7/8 to 10/11.

While these lines are exceptionally easy to cast and give incredible presentation, the very best results will be achieved if a Spey VersiLeader is attached to the front end. RIO has 6 different densities of these leaders in two lengths – 10 ft and 15 ft. The leader densities are:

1. Floating (olive)
2. Intermediate (1.5 inches per second)
3. Slow sink (2.4 inches per second)
4. Medium sink (3.9 inches per second)
5. Fast sink (5.6 inches per second)
6. Super fast sink (7.0 inches per second)

Use the 10 ft leaders with rods of 12’ 6” and less, and the 15 ft leaders with rods of 13 ft or more.

Attach the back of the shooting head to a hard nylon like Rio's Slick Shooter (35 lb or 50 lb) for the ultimate in distance, or to a floating Powerflex Core Shooting Line (0.030” or 0.035”) for something a little more manageable.


AFS OutBound® Integrated Shooting Head – NEW for 2008
Built with a thin, hard running line this line is the integrated version of the AFS head. It is an excellent choice of line for casters that do not want a loop to loop connection running through their guides. The short head is very easy to cast and particularly useful in tight situations and the long front taper gives a beautiful presentation. These lines are only available with a floating head and in sizes 4/5 to 10/11.

Like the AFS head, these lines will cast even better with one of RIO’s Spey VersiLeader.

The Skagit lines are, quite simply, the easiest way to cast large flies or fast sinking tips. The mass of the head and the short body length result in incredible lifting power, making it child’s play to cast otherwise “nasty” rigs. It is a very easy line to learn to cast with and also extremely useful for casting in tight situations. The Skagit line is available in: 300 (new for 2008), 350, 400, 450, 500, 550, 600, 650, 700 and 750 grain head weights.

The Skagit lines have a thin running line extending from the 27 ft long head that aids in easy distance and shooting ability. The front end finishes with a loop and to this loop you will need to attach some kind of tip. The line does not come with a front tip of any kind, so if you purchase this you will need to add a tip to your purchases. As explained earlier, you may also need a Skagit Cheater, depending on your rod length, casting style and size of sink tip used. RIO makes five 15 ft tips to choose from:

1. Floating
2. Intermediate (1.5 to 2 ips)
3. Type 3 (3-4 ips)
4. Type 6 (6-7 ips)
5. Type 8 (8-9 ips)

In addition you can purchase T-8, T-11 or T-14 and cut to the desired length and weight.


Rio's Skagit VersiTip Kit
The Skagit VersiTip is a Skagit line, packaged with a 5 ft floating Skagit Cheater, a 15 ft Type 6 tip, a 15 ft Type 8 tip and one of RIO’s shooting head wallets. For those that don’t know much about the Skagit technique and tackle it is a good purchase as it has pretty well everything you need to start with. The only possible add on would be a 15 Foot Floating Tip, for conditions when you don’t need to be deep. The Skagit VersiTip is available in 450, 550, 650 and 750 grain sizes.


Skagit Shooting Head
The Skagit shooting head is the head from the Skagit line. It is 27 ft long and has a loop in both ends. To the front end you attach a tip as recommended for the regular Skagit line, while the back end loop is ideal for attaching your favorite RIO shooting line. These heads are available in 350, 400, 450, 500, 550, 600, 650, 700 and 750 grain sizes.

One very simple fishing set-up is a reel loaded up with either SlickShooter or a floating Powerflex core shooting line and have a wallet with a couple of AFS heads (floating, slow intermediate and Sink 4 for steelhead fishers and floating, slow intermediate and intermediate sink tip for Atlantic salmon fishers) and a Skagit shooting head with some tips. With a rig like this, each fly fisher would be primed for everything and any situation they would encounter.

Windcutter
The original and still the best all round and the most versatile spey line developed. This line is available in a full floating version in sizes; 4/5, 5/6, 6/7/8, 7/8/9, 8/9/10, 9/10/11 and 10/11/12. The head length varies according to the size. It is also available as a VersiTip Line, packaged with a wallet of tips including a floating tip, a 15 ft clear intermediate tip, a 15 ft Type 3 tip, a 15 ft Type 6 tip and a 15 ft Type 8 tip. As mentioned above, there is also a sink tip compensator, which is a sinking Tip 2. The VersiTip line is available in 5/6, 6/7/8, 7/8/9, 8/9/10, 9/10/11 and 10/11/12 sizes, though the 5/6 VersiTip does not have a Type 8 sink tip, a sink tip compensator or a floating Tip 2.
(Note: I would also highly recommend the floating Windcutter, or Windcutter Versitip with floating tip, as the best all-around spey line for dead-drift nymph and dry presentations to trout and steelhead. Its head length is long enough to effectively stack mend for better drifts. - Dean Schubert  - Leland)

PowerSpey NEW for 2008
RIO’s new PowerSpey has a medium length head between 57 ft and 71 ft (depending on the size) and with its revolutionary taper design is the easiest mid to long belly line to cast. The longer head is ideal for longer rods, larger rivers and for casters that prefer to do less stripping of the fly between casts. Fishing with the PowerSpey line catches more fish - as there is little need to strip the head in between casts, the fly fisher will make more casts in a day, thus increasing the odds.

Another advantage with the longer head lines is when winter fishing with air temperatures below freezing. As there is no need to strip the line in between casts, the rod guides do not get iced up.

The PowerSpey is available in 5/6, 6/7, 7/8, 8/9, 9/10 and 10/11 sizes and either as a full floating line or as a VersiTip version. The PowerSpey VersiTip line does not have a Tip 2, so there is only one loop in the line.

Accessories

There are a few accessories RIO makes that are worth mentioning here.
 
The Skagit Floating Tip is a 15 ft floating tip designed to be added to the Skagit lines to make a full floater, it is also a good replacement for the WindCutter floating tip. Here is a guideline of which floating tip to choose for which Skagit line or shooting head:

 #7      300 to 400 grains
 #8      400 to 500 grain lines
 #9      500 to 600 grain lines
#10     550 to 650 grain lines
#11     600 to 700 grain lines
#12     650 to 750 grain lines.

The Skagit Cheaters are “plug-in” extensions as mentioned earlier. For 2008 RIO has changed the sizes to be more applicable. Each selection packet comes with a 2½ ft, a 5 ft and a 7½ ft floating cheater as well as a 5 ft intermediate cheater. RIO also sells the 5 ft floating cheater on its own. Here is a guideline of which Cheater to choose for which Skagit line or shooting head:

      6/7/8      300 to 350 grains
      7/8/9      350 to 450 grains
    8/9/10      450 to 550 grains
  9/10/11      550 to 650 grains
10/11/12      650 to 750 grains

The Big Boy is a 24 ft long sinking tip, ideal for really getting deep and staying deep. It is great on the end of a Skagit line, or a WindCutter, but remember to remove both Tip 1 and Tip 2 if you are attaching a Big Boy to the WindCutter. They are available in sizes 150, 200, 250, 300, 400, 500 and 600 grains and the sink rate of each is as follows:

150      4.8 ips
200      5.5 ips
250      6.4 ips
300      7.3 ips
400      8.4 ips
500      9.0 ips
600      9.5 ips

The WindCutter does not have as much lifting power as the Skagit line so will take a lighter Big Boy tip than the corresponding Skagit line. Here’s a rough guideline to the maximum weight Big Boy that each line will take. This does depend on the rod, current speed, fly size and caster’s skill!

WindCutter    Big Boy           Skagit  Big Boy 





 5/6   None    300  150
 6/7/8   200 gr    350  200
 7/8/9   250 gr    400  250
 8/9/10   300 gr    450  300
 9/10/11   300 gr    500  300
 10/11/12   400 gr    550  400
       600  400
       650  500
       700  500
       750  600
         
Simon's "Modern Spey Casting" is the best instructional DVD on spey casting ever produced. Learn the basics as well as these casts: roll cast, switch cast, single spey, double spey, snap T, snake roll, wombat cast, perry poke, jelly roll, skagit casts, underhand cast, spiral spey, overhead cast, single handed spey casts and using the two-handed rods in the salt. It also includes fault recognition, a glossary of terms and a very useful biokinetic section. 

Thanks again, Simon 'SpeyBro' Gawesworth, for giving a big boost to our spey line savvy! - Leland
 
See the Rio Spey Fly Line Chart for all Leland Spey Rods.
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Red Truck: Premium Cork Disk, Black, 7/8 Weight
A fully anodized and sealed reel for light tackle saltwater use or the meaner fish in freshwater.
5710
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detdesc::Leland on the Red Truck Premium 7/8 Reel





Bonefish, stripers and steelhead might want to read up on this reel to be prepared.  Sized to do battle with larger freshwater and smaller saltwater fish, the Premium 7/8 is perfect for what most people do with a heavier-weight fly rod…chase things that go fast.  For this reason, we designed our Premium 7/8 to hold ample backing for long-running fish.  The butter-smooth cork drag is infinitely adjustable, so you can dial in the perfect drag pressure.  Sealed bearing races are impervious to saltwater and the anodized finish means years of hard use and fast cleaning.  Simply put, you’d have to come up with something insanely stupid to stop this reel from doing its job.





Strap this reel to one of our Premium or Diesel fly rods and get fishing.  Don’t worry if you don’t yet own a Red Truck fly rod, as studies have shown this reel also works well on any quality brand fly rod, too.





Finally, for those who own a lighter weight two-handed or switch rod, make sure to take another look.  Here’s your new favorite fly reel.  
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  • Weight: 7.4 oz.
  • Spool Diameter: 3.4 in.
  • Spool Width: 1 in.
  • Capacity: WF7F + 175 yds. 20# ; WF8F + 150 yds. 20#
Leland on Red Truck Fly Fishing Company With all the fly fishing tackle available today, why would Red Truck Fly Fishing Company bring to market our own offering of fly fishing gear? Our honest answer is: with over 25 years of face-to-face retail experience with you, our customer, we've learned a few important things... You told us that you were confused with the "over the top" marketing hype manufactured by our industry's big brands. You were baffled by proprietary names for graphite modulus and confused by overly complicated reel drag systems. You told us there were too many bewildering product choices and that you wanted concise answers and recommendations to your questions and fishing needs. When purchasing fly gear, you wanted to feel confident that you were making a smart investment in a product that would not be replaced next year with a "newer" version. In essence, you wanted stuff that works and was worth your hard-earned money! At Red Truck, we've listened to you and leveraged our staff's combined 300 plus years of fly fishing experience to design equipment that is strictly necessary and that raises your level of enjoyment from purchase to use. We tested this gear with hard-working, no-nonsense, professional guides who rely on their tackle in the same way as a carpenter d'es his hammer. With each project, we always asked ourselves, "D'es this product deserve to exist?" Our Red Truck fly rods embody this honest thinking. Unlike some fly rod brands that employ a myopic marketing campaign, stating their rod is the lightest, at Red Truck, we focus on the big picture. We believe in the essential characteristics of a truly good rod: balance, minimal swing weight, true-tracking, stability and efficiency. The result of this balanced rod design approach is a selection of fly rods that are a joy to cast and fish. For our Red Truck Fly Reels, we took the same angle. Instead of inventing a new marketing slant or a hyper-technical pitch, we designed reels that speak to the core reason most of us fly fish: simplicity. We wanted to offer reels that get the job done, look good while doing it and last a long time. Take apart our Red Truck Premium fly reel and you'll know in a glance how the drag systems work and more importantly, why they won't fail. Sure, all our Red Truck equipment employs the latest in quality materials and manufacturing. Heck, we even work in titanium when necessary. But we never push any unproven concept or pseudo-technology, especially when we deem it unnecessary. At Red Truck, we believe that fly fishing should be fun and that your fly tackle should always work as intended. We like fishing memories of friends, dusty handshakes, wet dogs, great casts, beautiful places and even a fish or two. We design gear that takes you into the outdoors and gets the job done in the field, every time.
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Airflo Fly Line Review
305
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url::http://www.lelandfly.com/In-Stock/Rod-Reel-and-Line/Airflo-Fly-Line-Review.html
thumb::http://www.lelandfly.com/Airflo-Fly-Line-Review_2.jpg
detdesc::August 30, 2011 (San Francisco, CA):  The full line-up of Airflo’s high-performance fly lines is now available for purchase at Leland Fly Fishing Outfitters.



Advanced Technology from Across the Atlantic:
Airflo Fly Lines
present a fantastic addition to our selection of premium fly lines for
three primary reasons: (1) their low-stretch cores, (2) their
polyurethane construction, and (3) the Ridge technology featured in
their premier models.
 


 


Power Core: Airflo lines feature Airflo’s proprietary Power Core,
a low-stretch multifilament. The Power Core gives two critical
attributes: (a) appropriate suppleness over a wide temperature range and
(b) incredibly low stretch, less than 6%.



Low Stretch: This is one of the reasons why Airflo fly lines are
such excellent fishing tools. Any trout angler that favors streamers
understands that feeling strikes is critical, and any tarpon fisherman
knows that setting a hook into cinder block is best accomplished with a
low stretch line. These folks would do well to consider the Ridge Impact Taper and the Ridge Tarpon Line. For you steelheaders, when your fly is swinging into the bucket of a steelhead run, the Skagit Compact and Ridge Running Line
help you feel what’s happening at the other end, and facilitate
powerful hooksets should something chrome climb aboard. But there is
another, subtler benefit to Airflo’s low-stretch fly lines…



Greater Accuracy:  …And it has to do with casting. If this sounds
strange, imagine trying to cast a super long rubber band. At the end of
each false cast, the rubber band rebounds unpredictably, making proper
timing tough and magnifying the minute tracking errors that we all have
in our casting strokes. Airflo’s low stretch lines are more stable in
the air, enabling you to measure your false casts better, and place your
fly where you want it, whether that’s on the nose of a tailing permit,
or underneath an overhang, back in the tules, in the heart of bass
country.
 


 

The World’s Only Polyurethane Fly Lines: PU fly line
construction, a technology Airflo patented over twenty years ago,
provides Airflo’s loyal customer base with incredible durability and
longevity in their lines.



Crack-Free Performance: Unlike PVC, the material from which most
fly lines are made, PU is a thermoplastic. This means that unlike PVC,
PU does not require plasticizers to maintain the right balance of
rigidity and suppleness. Plasticizers are what leach out of PVC lines
over time, creating the cracks that begin to doom your favorite fly
line. Polyurethane fly lines, on the other hand, maintain the right
‘body’ from the moment they cure at Airflo’s factory in Wales.

  

Deet-Proof Fly Lines: If you’ve ever noticed your fly line took
some hits on a trip to a particularly buggy fishing locale, we know
you’re reading carefully: Unlike PVC, which can be eaten up rapidly by
Deet, Airflo’s polyurethane is completely unaffected by it. Some of the
places with the best fishing are also freaking buggy, so don’t hesitate
to protect yourself when fishing with Airflo.



UV Resistance: Polyurethane is the material a lot of boat decks
and dashboards are made out of, and for good reason. It performs well in
tough, high-UV environments. This means an Airflo fly line is a good
use of your fly fishing dollar, and will be sure to repay the investment
over many happy days in the water for seasons to come.

 


Ridge Technology:
Airflo's premier lines, like the Ridge Bonefish Line,
feature Ridge Technology. This is a surface texturing that produces fly
lines that have a cross section that looks like a mechanical gear.  Why
do you want this gear-shaped cross section rather than an ordinary
circle? Because only the outermost teeth of the gear contact your fly
rod’s guides, creating less friction, and allowing the line to slide
more easily in or out of the rod. The difference with a Ridge line like
the Ridge Tactical Fly Line is immediately obvious. Casting longer distances takes less effort and is more fun.
 


 


For us at Leland, casting is the defining attribute of fly fishing, and
every cast should be enjoyed. In talking with many of our customers,
we’ve begun to wonder if fly lines aren't the most underappreciated
piece of gear. A top-shelf fly line, like one from Airflo, is going to
enhance your fishing experience in almost every way.

Check out the best Airflo Fly Lines.

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